Apr 4

cpoas

In an effort to provide a comprehensive picture of smoking, drinking, and substance abuse–including long-term trends, effects on society, media and cultural influences, approaches to and effectiveness of treatment, and future implications–the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has published a report that incorporates more than three decades’ worth of data from several hundred public and private sources.

The report, “Substance Abuse: The Nation’s Number One Health Problem,” substantiates its title by documenting that tobacco, alcohol, and drug use cause more illnesses, deaths, and disabilities than any other preventable health problem. Of the more than two million deaths in the United States each year, one in four is attributable to tobacco, alcohol, or illicit substances.

The report looks at substance abuse from several different perspectives, including the following:

Early use. More than 40 percent of those who started drinking at age 14 or younger developed alcohol dependence, compared with 10 percent of those who began drinking at age 20 or older.

Media depictions. Alcohol appeared in 93 percent and tobacco in 89 percent of the 200 most popular movie rentals in 1996 and 1997.

Crime. At least half of all adults arrested for major crimes–including theft and assault–tested positive for drugs at the time of their arrest.

Treatment. Fewer than one-fourth of those in need receive treatment, although studies show that treatment is successful in up to 70 percent of alcohol patients and 80 percent of opiate users (with success defined as a 50 percent reduction in substance use after six months). Of the U.S. government’s drug control budget, three in five dollars are spent on criminal justice and interdiction, but fewer than one in five on treatment.

Education. People with …


Mar 3

An announcement of unusual importance to every business owner

FOUR years ago, the Mechanical Contractors Association of Greater Kansas City, with help from the Kansas Association of Addiction Professionals, adopted and implemented a Drug Abuse Policy following negotiations with Plumbers Local No. 8 and Pipe Fitters Local No. 533.

In announcing it to the public, MCA said:

 

dppi

“It is our policy to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees. We understand that the construction industry is an inherently dangerous industry that is internally regulated by a variety of local, state and federal regulations. We recognize the problems and hazards associated with the use of drugs, alcohol and controlled substances.

“The purpose of this policy and program is to establish and promote a safe, efficient and productive working environment for all employees by providing a workplace and workforce free from illegal drugs, alcohol and controlled substances. This policy shall apply to all employees performing work covered by the Collective Bargaining Agreements. Each employer shall have in place a similar policy which shall apply to all other employees.”

If the contractors and two unions were starting to create an agreement and contract today, or asked to restate the policy, the parties involved would not change one sentence or one word of the original announcement. In plain, simple language, it gives the reason for the very existence of the Association and explains its membership growth.

MCA is still proud of the record of its proven drug policy. If the Association were not, it would not have continued to implement it for so long.

Just recently, for example, the fourth annual month-long drug screening was conducted in seven different area …